Robert Scheer SI Podcast

Jennifer Rothman on the Privacy Rights You May Not Know You Have

The Loyola Law professor discusses her new book, "The Right of Publicity: Privacy Reimagined for a Public World," about the publicity's history.
The Loyola Law professor discusses her new book about the history and evolution of the right of publicity.
Robert Scheer, left, and Jennifer Rothman. (Photo credit: Mario Diaz)

Professor Rothman is a leading expert in both intellectual property law and the right of publicity. Her new book “The Right of Publicity: Privacy Reimagined for a Public World” delves into the right of publicity which protects individuals’ identities from being used without his or her permission. In their conversation, Rothman tells host Robert Scheer that the right of publicity is important to help the average person combat the invasion of privacy on the internet, but it can also be used by public figures to shut down speech. She says the right to publicity came about at around the time when cameras were developed and people’s likenesses could be captured and used without their permission. And Rothman says the idea of “opting in” where a person must give explicit consent to share their identity and information, is crucial to preserving privacy.

Credits

Guest:
Jennifer Rothman – Professor of Law, Loyola Law School

Host:
Robert Scheer

Producers:
Joshua ScheerRebecca Mooney

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